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Emergency funds ‘desperately needed’ by domestic abuse survivors



More than a third of people who have accessed TSB’s “flee fund” to help domestic abuse survivors have at least one child, according to figures from the bank.

TSB said that 136 people have accessed its fund in 10 months since launch, with 48 of them, or roughly 35%, having one or more children.

The fund offers existing TSB customers up to £500 to escape an abusive situation, with £356 being provided on average so far. The fund assists people with the cost of essentials such as travel, clothing and toiletries.

TSB introduced the scheme in December 2022, with TSB branch staff also receiving specialist training to spot signs of domestic abuse and to help survivors.

To prevent abuse reaching bank customers, the bank also blocks abusive and threatening terms from being sent to payees. Since introducing blocks in March, TSB has blocked over 8,000 abusive references from reaching their targets.



Emergency funds are desperately needed by those seeking to leave their abusers, especially now, given the additional challenges presented by the cost-of-living crisis

Farah Nazeer, Women’s Aid

TSB is also extending the scheme to staff affected by domestic abuse. TSB’s Colleague Flee Fund provides financial support to assist individuals with the cost of essentials that may be barriers to leaving an abusive relationship: such as accommodation, travel, clothing and toiletries.

To access the fund, staff can speak in confidence to their manager or HR, as well as by visiting a TSB branch.

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Katie Osiadacz, head of responsible business at TSB, said: “We have seen first-hand the impact our Emergency Flee Fund plays in helping survivors of domestic abuse take urgent action to escape their abusive and dangerous situation.”

Women’s Aid chief executive Farah Nazeer said: “Emergency funds are desperately needed by those seeking to leave their abusers, especially now, given the additional challenges presented by the cost-of-living crisis.

“Through our work with survivors, we constantly hear about the economic barriers preventing them from fleeing their abusers. Women and their children are often faced with insecurity – they either face homelessness or must rely on the circumstances of family and friends to be able to put them up for short periods of time.”

Dr Nicola Sharp-Jeffs, founder and CEO of Surviving Economic Abuse (SEA) said: “We know via our partnership with Money Advice Plus that increasing numbers of victim-survivors are unable to access £100 by the end of each month.

“Accessing the funds needed to leave could be the difference between a survivor being able to safely move on and rebuild their life or remaining trapped with an abuser and facing more harm as a result.

“The impact of TSB’s initiative on the lives of victim-survivors cannot be underestimated and SEA is proud to work alongside them.”

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